The Absence of Someone We Love - Sunday, January 22, 2017

One of life’s universal and unavoidable experiences is to lose someone we love. All who have lived and loved will lose cherished family and friends to death. Whether early or late, suddenly or gradually, dramatically or peacefully, death comes for everyone. And when it comes for a loved one, our whole world can change in an instant, and we may wonder how we can ever go on.

[Read More]


The Way out of No Way- Sunday, January 15, 2017

Every society is only as good as its people. It follows, then, that to build a better society we need a foundation of brave men and women who do the right thing. Often, that foundation is tested by struggle and conflict, but it may be that those very challenges are what bring out the greatness within people and nations.

[Read More]


A Single Word - Sunday, January 8, 2017

It has become popular of late for organizations—and even families and individuals—to create a mission statement to guide their actions and clarify their values. Such a statement can serve to remind us who we are and what we’re about. When life gets hectic and choices get complicated, a statement of purpose and vision can keep us focused on those things that we value most.

[Read More]


Follow the Sun - Sunday, January 1, 2017

Although we can do it anytime, the beginning of a new year feels like a natural time to reflect upon the past, even as we look forward to the future. It’s a chance to leave behind yesterday’s regrets, build on yesterday’s successes, and look forward to a tomorrow full of potential. There’s no reason to doubt that this year can be the best ever. Indeed, when a positive spirit ignites realistic goals, the resulting flame can fuel our efforts to accomplish great things.
That doesn’t mean we expect the next year to be perfect, of course. None of us knows exactly what is coming, but it’s safe to assume that this year, like other years, will have its ups and downs. There will be moments of happiness and joy, along with moments of heartache and worry. Where can we find the courage and perspective to carry on throughout it all?

[Read More]


Good News and Glad Tidings - Sunday, December 25, 2016

On that holy night so long ago, angels ushered in the world’s first Christmas celebration with a declaration of “good tidings of great joy.”1 And ever since, good tidings of great joy have filled the hearts of all who celebrate Christmas. It’s only natural that we imagine that host of angels as a choir and their proclamation as a song. What better way to express such exultant feelings than with glorious music! Whether we are performing, singing along, or just listening, the music of Christmas unites us in a celebration of good news.

[Read More]


“The Picture Window of the Soul” - Sunday, December 18, 2016

It was a busy night at the inn, two thousand years ago in Bethlehem—so busy, in fact, that when Mary and Joseph arrived, there was “no room for them.”1 And so the couple was forced to seek refuge in a lowly stable. There the baby Jesus was born, attended by humble animals and simple shepherds. Surely the King of Kings should have had more comfortable surroundings. But He didn’t, and perhaps there is a lesson in that for all of us

[Read More]


Luke 2 Reading - Rolando Villazon - Sunday, December 11, 2016

And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Cæsar Augustus, that all the world should be taxed.

And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city.

And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judæa, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem,

[Read More]


Gifts of Christmas - Sunday, December 4, 2016

There’s something undeniably special about Christmastime. It’s a season of beloved songs and stories, of treasured memories and traditions. People of all faiths and cultures can sense that something changes for the better at this time of year. In the most personal and intimate ways, Christmas brings people together.

[Read More]


Anticipate Joy to the World - Sunday, November 27, 2016

Much of the joy of life comes from anticipation. Who has not looked forward to a weekend, a reunion, a trip, or a holiday? The anticipation can be just as exciting as the event itself. It gives us a sense of hope for the future, a reason to keep going when life gets us down. In the cold, stark winter, we dream of the warmth and life of spring. On hot summer days, we look forward to the brisk, refreshing weather of fall. And when the harvest season ends, we await what is perhaps the most anticipated season of all—the advent of Christmas


[Read More]


The Thankful Heart - Sunday, November 20, 2016 - Thanksgiving Special

Long before the New England colonists held their now-legendary autumn feast nearly 400 years ago, and well before Thanksgiving was ever a holiday, giving thanks has been essential to the human soul. And that’s true not only in times of plenty. On good days and bad, through abundance and scarcity, we make life sweeter when we count our blessings.

[Read More]


The Best Job in the World - Sunday, November 13, 2017

Parenting has been called the most difficult job in the world. Most will attest that it sometimes seems easier to succeed in the workplace, move up the corporate ladder, and enjoy the praise of work associates and friends than to feel that you’re doing a good job as a parent. And with parenting, unlike most professions, the work is never done. Indeed, good parents never retire.


[Read More]


“Blessed Are the Peacemakers” - Veteran's Day Special - Sunday, November 6, 2016

On November 11, 1918, at 11:00 in the morning, warring nations agreed to an armistice—a truce—and World War I came to an end. Bombing and gunfire ceased, soldiers returned to their families, and the war-scarred land rested and began to heal. Years later, the 11th day of the 11th month became a national day of remembrance—Veterans Day, a day “dedicated to the cause of world peace.”1 Yet it wasn’t long before, once again, the sounds of war would be heard and soldiers would be called upon to serve their country in defense of freedom.

[Read More]


The Promise of Better Days - Sunday, October 30, 2016

Maynard Dixon, a prolific artist from the previous century, is best known for his vibrant paintings of the American West. He spent much of his life roaming the western United States, which he loved so much, capturing on canvas images of the peoples and places he saw. But during the Great Depression in the 1930s, Dixon’s artistic focus changed: he painted a series of images depicting striking and displaced workers. One of those paintings, Forgotten Man, captured the poignant feelings of so many people during that time


[Read More]


Art Matters - Sunday. October 23, 2016

When things get rushed and hectic, as they often do, it’s easy to view life as little more than a series of practical demands to be met. But then we hear a beautiful song, we see an exquisite painting, or we read a stunning poem, and we are reminded that life, at its heart, is beautiful and brilliant, elevating and enriching. Yes, the world has its practical, methodical side, but life is just as much an art as it is a science.


[Read More]


You Are Sure to Be Happy Again - Sunday, October 16, 2016

During the American Civil War, Lieutenant Colonel William McCullough, fighting for the Union, died heroically trying to rally his troops during an ambush. He was one of thousands who perished in that deadliest of American wars, but President Abraham Lincoln had a personal connection to this soldier. He had become acquainted with the McCullough family during his days as an attorney in Illinois, and the two men had served together during the Black Hawk War.


[Read More]


Doing and Becoming - Sunday, October 9, 2016

An old proverb says, “The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago. The second-best time is now.”1 It’s true for improving a landscape, and it’s true for improving our lives. Whether you want to read a novel or write one, take a walk or climb a mountain, the sooner you begin, the sooner you can become the person you want to be.


[Read More]


The Shoulder of Giants - Sunday, October 2, 2016

In the Chartres Cathedral in France, four stained-glass windows depict the four Evangelists: Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. It’s not unusual to find something like this in a medieval cathedral, but these particular images are unique because each of the Gospel writers is being carried on the shoulders of a revered Old Testament prophet: Jeremiah, Isaiah, Ezekiel, or Daniel. In beautiful art glass, these images capture what Bernard, the 12th-century chancellor of the School of Chartres, told his students: we stand on the shoulders of the giants who preceded us.

[Read More]


The Power of Pausing- Sunday, September 25, 2016

Sometimes, in order to move faster, we need to slow down. In order to see better, we need to close our eyes for a while. And in order to progress, we need to take an occasional step back. It seems counterintuitive, but some of the most successful people know that success doesn’t come just from relentless pushing—we actually do better if we have regular moments of rest.


[Read More]


Good Music and Good Company - Sunday, September 18, 2016

More than 50 years ago, three women from Pennsylvania, two sisters and a friend, attended a performance by the Pittsburgh Symphony for the first time. Now, a half century later, they have attended nearly 600 performances.


[Read More]


Rebuilding - Sunday, September 11, 2016

There are few moments in life that better highlight the unconquerable human spirit than the moment when hearts and hands turn to the task of rebuilding. Although life is basically good, disasters happen—most of them minor, but some so devastating that we wonder how we will ever move forward and rebuild. And yet somehow we do. We have done it in the past, we are doing it now, and we will keep doing it in the future. If it’s true that to err is human, then it’s just as human to muster our strength, pick ourselves up, and carry on.


[Read More]


“Work: The Engine of Life” - Sunday, September 4, 2016

Everything good that has ever been accomplished in human history happened because of work—usually hard work. Sometimes our most enthusiastic efforts have been focused on finding ways to make work easier. But the work never completely goes away, does it? That’s because work is the engine of life. It gives us reason to get up in the morning and satisfaction when we take our rest in the evening. In many countries, there is even a day to honor the men and women who get things done—we call it Labor Day.

[Read More]


The Miracle of Transformation- Sunday, August 28, 2016

There’s something enchanting about butterflies. Even on our busy days, we almost can’t help but stop and watch when one flutters by. And most of us know the familiar green chrysalis from which a beautiful monarch butterfly will someday emerge.
But what’s happening inside that chrysalis may surprise you. Many of us think a caterpillar is simply hibernating in there, slowly growing wings. But what’s actually happening is even more miraculous. Once encased in a chrysalis, the caterpillar releases enzymes that turn its body into liquid. From this watery soup, the entire creature is rebuilt. The muscles, the nervous system, the heart—everything is completely re-created, and the lowly caterpillar transforms into a brilliant butterfly.1


[Read More]


Putting Worry in Its Place - Sunday, August 21, 2016

Nobody’s life is worry free, but that doesn’t mean our worries need to run our lives. Learning how to manage our worries can make all the difference in our well-being. This is what a busy young father learned. He had a challenging career and was feeling overwhelmed with his many responsibilities. He would come home from work every night feeling anxious and even physically ill. He found it very difficult to sleep at night. He went to his physician for help; he prayed and pondered about what to do. The man soon realized that he needed to stop worrying so much. But how would he do that?


[Read More]


Nature’s Beautiful Gifts - Sunday, August 14, 2016

The best remedy for the stresses and tensions of modern life is simpler than we might think: spend some time outside. When we interact with the natural world, we feel less stressed, more focused, more contented and happy. There’s something invigorating about the subtle yet pleasing stimulation of nature—the sound of a trickling brook, the sight of a bird taking flight, the fresh smell of earth right after a rainstorm. Nature has an undeniable, uplifting effect on us that’s hard to define but easy to feel.


[Read More]


Winners and Champions - Sunday, August 7, 2016

It’s been said that “life does not determine winners. Winners determine life.”1 Most true winners have “lost” at some point in life. They have been hurt and disappointed; they have experienced setbacks and sorrow, but they do not let these difficulties determine their destiny or define their lives. Instead, they strive to rise above their challenges and keep moving forward one day at a time. In fact, it is very often the defeats, just as much as the victories, that bring out the greatness in a true champion.


[Read More]


A Perfect Brightness of Hope - Sunday, July 31, 2016

A young woman from a disadvantaged background stood on the stage in cap and gown, proudly holding the university diploma she had just been awarded. With perseverance, she had achieved what many thought impossible. When asked how she had done it—how she had managed to pull herself out of such difficult circumstances—she replied, “I had hope! I just kept going and never lost hope.”


[Read More]


Strong Men, Brave Women and Sturdy Children- Sunday, July 24, 2016

More than 150 years ago, thousands of stalwart pioneers fled their comfortable homes into the wilderness in search of freedom from religious persecution. A newspaper headline from 1914 summarized their remarkable westward trek in these words: “Strong Men, Brave Women and Sturdy Children Crossed the Wilderness Afoot.”1


[Read More]


More Than Just a Song- Sunday, July 17, 2016

Written by the people and for the people, folk music is appropriately named; it truly is the music of the folks—the common people, even the family. When people share their traditions and values through music, they create a powerful connection with other human beings. We come to associate the music with the feelings it inspires, and quite often, we want to share that music with others. And so folk music continues to thrive. One generation after another shares the songs that have chronicled their lives.


[Read More]


America's Best Idea- Sunday, July 10, 2016

In 1872, United States President Ulysses S. Grant signed a bill designating Yellowstone as America’s first national park. In fact, it was the first national park in the world. More than that, it was the birth of a new idea—the preservation of a natural site of notable beauty and importance. The idea caught on, and over the next 44 years, another 34 national parks and monuments, along with an agency to maintain them, were created. Here at Yellowstone National Park, we mark the 100th anniversary of the founding of the National Park Service, and we celebrate what author and environmentalist Wallace Stegner called “the best idea [America] ever had.”


[Read More]


“God Bless America” - Sunday, July 3, 2016

Irving Berlin, America’s most successful songwriter, was born in a small Russian village near the Siberian border. Threats of violence forced his family to flee Russia when he was only five years old, and they eventually found a home in the United States.

So perhaps it’s not surprising that when the well-known singer Kate Smith asked Irving Berlin to write a patriotic song for her, he wrote what he called “a ballad of home. It’s not a song about a flag, or liberty, or something like that,” he said. “It’s a song about home. Instead of the home being a little cottage, it’s America.”


[Read More]


Radiate Goodness - Sunday, June 26, 2016

The choices we make not only shape our lives but, in a way, show on our face. We all know people who seem to have a light in their eyes, people who seem to light up a room. In most cases, it’s not their charisma but their character that impresses us—not their personality but their purity. The goodness of their lives is reflected on their countenance. They project the kind of confidence that comes from living with honor and integrity.


[Read More]


Fathers Always Matter - Sunday, June 19, 2016

A young father, noticing that his wife was not feeling well, made extra efforts to help out. He took care of things around the house, prepared a warm bath for her, and took the children for a walk so she could rest. “Don’t worry,” he told her. “I’ll take care of you.” Imagine the satisfaction he felt when, a few days later, he heard his three-year-old daughter use these same words when she acted kindly to her mother. The father felt grateful but also humbled. He realized how closely his daughter was observing his behavior. He determined to be more intentional about setting a good example for his daughter to follow.

[Read More]


Steady, Reliable Old Faithful- Sunday, June 12, 2016

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the founding of the National Park Service, entrusted with the care of America’s national parks. The first of those parks was Yellowstone, known today for its wildlife, its mountain forests, and especially its geothermal features—about half of the world’s geysers are in Yellowstone.


[Read More]


Leadership at Its Best - Sunday, June 5, 2016

Arthur Wright was a simple preacher living in South Carolina during an era of deep racial tension. The future did not seem particularly bright for an African American family like his, but Arthur encouraged his children to rise to the greatness within them. His daughter Marian wrote of him: “I was fourteen years old the night my Daddy . . . passed away. He had holes in his shoes but two children out of college, one in college, another in divinity school, and a vision he had conveyed to me that I, a young Black girl, could be and do anything I wanted.”


[Read More]


A Silent Hymn to the Fallen - Sunday, May 29, 2016 Memorial Day Special

Here at the historic West Point Cemetery at the United States Military Academy, we remember and reflect upon the service and sacrifice of those who have served our nation since its founding.
The cemetery is on a beautiful promontory overlooking the Hudson River as it flows endlessly into the Atlantic Ocean, reminding us that life, with all its bends and rapids, rolls on just as surely to our final resting place. It is calm and peaceful here today—a poignant contrast to the memories and images of war evoked by the names, gravestones, and monuments scattered throughout this cemetery.


[Read More]


Of Happiness and Complaints- Sunday, May 22, 2016

There’s no question that we live in a beautiful world and that life is full of reasons to be grateful and joyful. But unfortunately, we still manage to find things to complain about. It may be the weather, traffic, current events, the people around us—or anything in between. Yes, life can be a challenge at times, but there are better ways to face life’s challenges than complaining about them.


[Read More]


What is True Greatness? - Sunday, May 15, 2016

People all over the world, in every culture and clime, pursue greatness. The desire to succeed and excel is as universal as it is natural. But what is true greatness? How do we know when we have achieved it? Some might say that greatness happens in rare, extraordinary moments when someone of unusual ability rises above his or her peers.


[Read More]


Somebody's Mother - Sunday, May 8, 2016

On the second Sunday in May 1908, Anna Jarvis honored her late mother, Ann Reeves Jarvis, by organizing America’s first-ever Mother’s Day services. In 1914 President Woodrow Wilson made it a national holiday, but by then this official action was mostly a technicality. Anna Jarvis had already persuaded most states in the union to observe Mother’s Day. Now the tradition of a special day to honor mothers has spread around the world.


[Read More]


The Time to Prepare - Sunday, May 1, 2016

A high school student learned a valuable lesson as he took a college entrance exam a few months ago. The night before the test, he read through the instructions he had received. He verified the time the exam would start. He sharpened his pencils. He put his calculator in his backpack. He felt ready for the early-morning test


[Read More]


The Gift of Life- Sunday, April 24, 2016

Have you ever observed a child who finds an injured bird on the ground? Almost instinctively, she wants to take it in, feed it, and make sure it doesn’t die. It’s the same impulse that leads a sailor to spend hours helping a dolphin get untangled from a fishing line. It’s what inspires a gardener to tend a withering plant, hoping to restore it to health again. It’s what causes an entire community to rally to the rescue when someone—even a stranger—is lost in the mountains or stranded in a mine.


[Read More]


Weather the Storms- Sunday, April 17, 2016

An experienced and now retired pilot and flight instructor learned valuable lessons about life while flying airplanes around the world. He learned that even though pilots control massive, powerful flying machines, there are some things they cannot control: they can’t change the direction of the wind, stop the rain or the snow, or smooth out the turbulence jolting the airplane.


[Read More]


Important Days - Sunday, April 10, 2016

For the most part, every day on the calendar is like every other—each starts with sunrise and ends with a sunset, with lots of busyness in between. But there are certain days that we set apart. National holidays, for example, help us remember our past and inspire our future. Religious holidays turn our hearts toward things of the soul. And then we have personal days of remembrance—such as birthdays and anniversaries—to commemorate the milestones in our own lives and the lives of those we love.


[Read More]


What Love Is - Sunday, April 3, 2016

Sometimes, we come to know what something is by understanding what it is not. We learn of integrity, for example, by confronting dishonesty. We learn of courage as we encounter fear. And we can learn of love as we consider its counterfeits. Love is not overbearing or controlling; love is not jealous or unkind; love is not neglectful, impatient, or fickle.


[Read More]


The Great Light of Hope- Sunday, March 27, 2016

Why is it that the most significant, beautiful moments in life so often come just after periods of darkness and sorrow? The birth of a new child is always preceded by a mother’s pain and travail. The joyful colors of spring are most inspiring because they come on the heels of a dreary winter. And glorious sunrises would be meaningless if they didn’t follow the darkness of night


[Read More]


An Opportunity to Learn- Sunday, March 20, 2016

We were created to grow. Life is an adventure in learning and progress, becoming a little wiser and better each day. In this sense, without some kind of growth or improvement, we cease to live. And this life, where we are surrounded by fellow learners, is the best setting for learning.


[Read More]


A Brighter Tomorrow- Sunday, March 13, 2016

In a scene that plays out often in snowy weather, a young driver was in a hurry to meet a friend and hit an icy patch on the road. Before she could react, the car slid off the road and wedged tightly into a snowbank. The snow cushioned the impact, but the car was stuck. Soon the young woman was able to signal to a kind passerby who helped her free the car, and she was on her way.


[Read More]


Take Care of Your Garden- Sunday, March 6, 2016

Every year, as winter finally gives way to spring, the warmer weather and sunnier days draw us outside, inviting us put our hands in the soil and plant something. Nothing quite compares to the satisfaction of watching something grow: tomatoes or peas, a pine tree or an apple tree, or whatever seeds we may plant. Nurturing a garden takes time, resourcefulness, and commitment. As every good gardener knows, consistent care is the only way to get anything to grow.


[Read More]


What Can Be the Meaning of Life?- Sunday, February 28, 2016

Before Viktor Frankl became a renowned psychologist; before he survived a Nazi concentration camp; and before he wrote Man’s Search for Meaning, a bestselling book about his experiences; he was a high school student who thought deeply about life—more deeply than perhaps most teenagers do. One day his science teacher declared to the class, “Life is nothing more than a combustion process, a process of oxidation.” Young Viktor leaped from his chair and countered, “Sir, if this is so, then what can be the meaning of life?”1


[Read More]


Breaking Bread- Sunday, February 21, 2016

We live in a time of great division. Advances in technology have, in many ways, made our world smaller, but instead of coming together, we seem at times to be growing farther apart. Many of us wish for a way to bridge the cultural divides around us. We see people of other faiths or other nationalities, and we wonder how we might befriend those who seem so different from us.


[Read More]


A More Perfect Union- Sunday, February 14, 2016

On June 17, 1775, Abigail Adams and her seven-year-old son, John Quincy, stood on a hill near their home and watched, terrified, as the Battle of Bunker Hill unfolded. It was a pivotal moment in the American Revolution. More than a thousand were killed or wounded, and nearby Charlestown was burned to the ground.


[Read More]


Choosing to Act- Sunday, February 7, 2016

One evening two young friends were walking together when they passed a neighbor standing in his front yard. One of the young men called out, “How are you, Bill? It’s good to see you.” But Bill ignored him—he didn’t respond or even look up.

“Well, he’s a grouch today, isn’t he?” the other boy observed.

“Oh, he’s always that way,” his friend responded.

“Then why are you so friendly to him?”

“Why not?” he answered. “Why should I let him decide how I am going to act?”1


[Read More]


Life as We Would Like It to Be- Sunday, January 31, 2016

American artist Norman Rockwell was known as the artist of the common man and of common places. His models were his neighbors and family members, his subjects the plain and simple moments of life, and he depicted them with fondness. Among his hundreds of paintings, he captured the essence of human connection with all of its emotion and excitement—the joy of a long-awaited homecoming, the thrill of a youthful adventure, the tenderness and insecurity of growing older, and the warmth of a sacred gathering with loved ones to give thanks.


[Read More]


The Road of Life- Sunday, January 24, 2016

It’s common in many cultures to compare life to a path, a road, a journey. And anyone who has ever embarked on a long journey can see why it makes such a useful metaphor. It helps us to see life with purpose and direction, to feel that we are making progress, that we’re getting somewhere—and not just anywhere, but toward a specific destination we want to reach.


[Read More]


Equal Persons - Sunday, January 17, 2016

Much of the strength of our nation comes from its people and their determination to make life better—their resolute unwillingness to accept injustice and oppression. Such determination comes with many challenges, but history has shown that freedom is born in only one way, and that’s by courageous people fighting through adversity.


[Read More]


The Power of Humility- Sunday, January 10, 2016

The world in which we live is fiercely competitive—some would even say ruthless. The pressure to succeed, to get ahead, leads many to be aggressive, dominating, overpowering. And succeed they often do—in a sense. But there’s a different, even a better way to live and to succeed. It is, in a word, humility.


[Read More]


What Are We Busy About? Sunday, January 3, 2016

“It is not enough to be [busy],” wrote Henry David Thoreau. “So are the ants.” The question is, “What are you [busy] about?”1 We live in a world that frequently confuses busyness with importance. Thoreau’s words are a good reminder just because something “takes some doing,” that doesn’t mean it’s worth doing.


[Read More]


The Successful Life - Sunday, December 27, 2015- New Years Special

In the American Museum of Natural History in New York City stands a memorial to Theodore Roosevelt, an avid naturalist, a great friend to the museum, and the 26th president of the United States. Inscribed on this memorial, under the title “Youth,” are these words from Roosevelt that are inspiring even to those of us whose youth is in our past:

[Read More]


Luke 2 Reading- (Guest Narrator Mark Jarvis) - Sunday, December 20, 2015

“On Earth Peace, Good Will Toward Men”

And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Cæsar Augustus, that all the world should be taxed.

And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city.

And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judæa, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem,

To be taxed with Mary his espoused wife, being great with child.

And so it was, that, while they were there, the days were accomplished that she should be delivered.

[Read More]


Small, Quiet, Peaceful - Sunday, December 13, 2015

Very often, small things lead to great things. In fact, we could say that everything starts small. From a small idea comes an innovation or discovery that transforms the way we live. A deep snowdrift starts with just a few small flakes. And a small child can soften even the hardest heart and inspire us to change our lives for the better.


[Read More]


Let There Be Light - Sunday, December 6, 2015

This is the season of lights. The joy, the hope, and the sacred reverence we feel at this time of year all find their own symbolic expression in holiday lights. Storefronts, town squares, and homes are decorated with strings of colorful lights that brighten the celebration and bring cheer to passersby. Bright lights dangle on evergreens, many topped with a star in remembrance of the light that marked the first Christmas morning.


[Read More]


When Christmas Comes-Sunday, November 29, 2015

Part of what makes Christmastime so delightful are simple carols like this one, an old nursery rhyme set to a traditional melody:

Christmas is coming,
The geese are getting fat,
Please . . . put a penny
In the old man’s hat.
If you haven’t got a penny,
A ha’penny will do,
If you haven’t got a ha’penny,
Then God bless you.


[Read More]


Prayer of Thanksgiving - Sunday, November 22, 2015- Thanksgiving Special

Some 400 years ago, the Netherlands suffered through a prolonged and bitter war with Spain as it sought religious and political independence. At last, celebrating their triumph over oppression, the Dutch victors set their sentiments to a familiar folk melody. The opening words to that song were later translated into English as “We gather together to ask the Lord’s blessing.”1


[Read More]


Knowledge versus Wisdom - Sunday, November 15, 2015

We live in a day when more knowledge is literally at our fingertips than ever before. With the click of a button or the touch of a screen, we can learn about any topic imaginable. Millions of articles, instructional videos, and the latest breaking news seem to swirl around us. This explosion of information fills our brains and makes us wiser than ever before. Or does it?
The mere collection of facts does not necessarily lead to wise behavior. We all know people with brilliant minds who make unfortunate choices because they lack wisdom. The world has seen far too many tyrants who know how to fight a war but not how to avoid one.


[Read More]


A Symbol of Freedom - Veterans Day Special - November 8, 2015

The eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. That moment in 1918 marked the end of World War I and the beginning of an annual tradition of remembrance. For the next several years, November 11 was known as Armistice Day, a day of gratitude for peace and for those who sacrificed so much to secure it in that “war to end all wars.” Of course, wars did not end, and more and more Americans were called into the service of their country. So, in the aftermath of World War II and the Korean War, November 11 was renamed Veterans Day in honor of all military veterans—today numbering 25 million and counting—who gave so much for the cause of freedom.


[Read More]


Courage to Endure - Sunday, November 1, 2015

Long-distance runner John Stephen Akhwari represented Tanzania in the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City with an unforgettable performance in the marathon. He did not set a new world record. He did not even earn a medal. In fact, by the time he crossed the finish line, the sun had set, the winner had been crowned over an hour earlier, and most of the fans had left the stadium. But Akhwari’s performance still inspires to this day.


[Read More]


Good Books - Sunday, October 25, 2015

For hundreds of years, men and women and even nations have been shaped by influential books. If it’s true that we are what we eat, then it’s equally true that we are what we read.
In both serious and delightful ways, good books expand our worldview and inform our thoughts and opinions. Good books also entertain and enlighten us. They help us see and understand others—and, ultimately, ourselves—in new ways. Anytime we read a good book, we make new discoveries that can stretch us, transport us, and teach us how to marvel.


[Read More]


A Home That Lasts Forever - Sunday, October 18, 2015

Recently an older home was demolished to make room for a new house to be built on the same property. Over the decades, that home had been filled with laughter and memories, and now, almost in the blink of an eye, it was gone, and the slow work of rebuilding began. It was a reminder of the simple truth that it is always easier to destroy than to build.


[Read More]


The Power of Preparation - Sunday. October 11, 2015

In one of his legendary fables, Aesop, the master storyteller, tells of an encounter between an ant and a grasshopper. It was a sunny summer day, and the grasshopper was relaxing and making music. Then the ant came by, carrying a load of food to its nest. “Why not come and chat with me,” said the grasshopper, “instead of working so hard all day?”


[Read More]


Happy and Blessed - Sunday, October 4, 2015

Many decades ago, on quiet mornings before school and work, a sleepy young family used to gather in the living room of their modest home to read scriptures, pray, and talk about eternal things. Today the children, now well into middle age, vividly remember how their father would pull out a large, flattened cardboard box on which he had written some inspirational words of the Savior. During those early mornings, from this makeshift poster, the family would read and reflect on such life-changing truths as these:

[Read More]


A Note of Appreciation - Sunday, September 27, 2015

We all want to feel appreciated—that our efforts are valued, that our contribution makes a difference. Hearing even a simple expression of gratitude can inspire us to do our best.


[Read More]


“Better Drawings Than Before” - Sunday, September 20, 2015

John James Audubon, a world-famous birdwatcher, naturalist, and painter, is credited with discovering 25 species of birds. He is perhaps best known for his masterful book titled The Birds of America, filled with colorful life-size illustrations of nearly 500 different birds. Almost 200 years later, it is still considered one of the finest picture books ever created.


[Read More]


Make Someone Smile Today - Sunday, September 13, 2015

Life was not meant to be an unending sequence of beautiful days. But beautiful things can happen even on ugly days, and often those beautiful things happen when we find a way to make someone smile.


[Read More]


Resourcefulness and Ingenuity - Sunday, September 6, 2015

Sometimes life’s most difficult problems can be solved in the most unexpected ways. In fact, even when a situation seems downright hopeless, a little resourcefulness and ingenuity can lead to surprising solutions.


[Read More]


Early to Bed and Early to Rise - Sunday, August 30, 2015

How many times have we been told to go to sleep early and awake early in the morning? Centuries ago, the American statesman and scientist Benjamin Franklin famously said, “Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.”1 And he was just echoing the even-older advice of Aristotle: “It is well to be up before day-break, for such a habit contributes to health, wealth and wisdom.”2


[Read More]


Our Life Stories - Sunday, August 23, 2015

We each have a backstory—the experiences, events, and choices that helped shape us into the people we’ve become. One of the best ways to understand a person, even someone we might disagree with, is to learn his or her story. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow put it this way: “If we could read the secret history of our enemies, we should find in each man’s life sorrow and suffering enough to disarm all hostility.”1 Though most of us don’t see each other as enemies, the sentiment is clear. It’s much harder to dislike a person whose story you understand.


[Read More]


Life Is a Group Project - Sunday, August 16, 2015

At a recent high school graduation, the class valedictorian spoke of the most important thing he had learned in 13 years of public education. Among his many classes and extracurricular activities, one moment in particular stood out. His teacher had just divided the class into groups for a project that they would work on—and be graded on—as teams rather than individually. Sensing the students’ distaste for this approach, the teacher preempted their complaints by explaining, “Get used to working in groups because, in the end, life is a group project.”


[Read More]


Brighten the World - Sunday, August 9, 2015

Moonlight, with its soft, silver tones and the enchanting mood it casts, has captured our fancy for centuries. It has been the subject of countless poems, songs, serenades, and evening walks. We marvel at how bright a full moon can seem sometimes, even though we know it is merely reflecting the light it receives from the sun. In fact, our full moon, at its very brightest, only reflects about 12 percent of the light that reaches it.


[Read More]


The Joy of Enough - Sunday, August 2, 2015

It has been said that when you compare yourself to others, two things can happen—and both are harmful: you may decide you are better than other people, or you may conclude that other people are better than you, which will leave you feeling unsettled, dissatisfied, and discouraged. As one commentator observed: “For some people, the pleasure of having something good is drained as soon as they see someone else with something better.


[Read More]


Two Brothers Who Changed the World - Sunday, July 26, 2015

In 1897, the Washington Post boldly announced, “It is a fact that man can’t fly.” Apparently, someone forgot to tell that to Wilbur and Orville Wright.
In 1900, Wilbur glided 300 feet over the dunes of Kitty Hawk on North Carolina’s Outer Banks in a glider he and his brother had designed. Three years and many attempts later, Orville flew in a powered plane for 12 seconds. It wasn’t long before they were in the air flying for miles, and the Wright brothers had become the unlikely inventors of the world’s first successful aircraft.


[Read More]


Our Pioneering Journey - Sunday, July 19, 2015

To many, the word pioneer conjures up images of covered wagons, dusty oxen, and hearty men and women seeking a new home in the American West. Or it may remind us of someone who makes important scientific discoveries. In reality, a pioneer can be anyone who moves bravely forward into the unknown—and doesn’t that pretty well describe all of us on the journey of life?


[Read More]


Writing and Rewriting Our Story - Sunday, July 12, 2015

Some call it journaling. Others call it expressive writing or creating a personal mission statement. Whatever it’s called, something happens when we take time to seriously ponder our life and then write about who we are, what direction we want our life to take—what our goals and aspirations are for the future. Studies have shown that writing about our personal experiences can improve our mood and even our physical health.


[Read More]


“God Bless America” - Sunday, July 5, 2015

Irving Berlin, America’s most successful songwriter, was born in a small Russian village near the Siberian border. Threats of violence forced his family to flee Russia when he was only five years old, and they eventually found a home in the United States.


[Read More]


Successful Fathers - Sunday, June 21, 2015

As inevitable aging began to take its toll, one good man questioned whether he had been the kind of father he had hoped to be. Mustering his courage, he called his three children together and, with his wife at his side, made this poignant request: “Tell me how you feel about me as your father. What did I do right, and what did I do wrong?” One by one, the children shared their very personal thoughts and feelings.

[Read More]


Resisting Temptation - Sunday, June 14, 2015

It’s human nature to want to improve, to progress—to overcome our weaknesses and build upon our strengths. Unfortunately, it’s also part of human nature to get distracted and give in to temptation. How many times, for example, have we set goals to exercise or improve our diet, only to find ourselves eating junk food again before long?

[Read More]


The Deeper Virtues - Sunday, June 7, 2015

Successful New York Times columnist David Brooks once visited a group of 30 tutors, many of them elderly women, who taught English to immigrants. He was surprised by what he saw in these volunteers’ faces. “They just radiated a generosity of spirit,” he said. “They radiated a patience and most of all they radiated gratitude for life.” He thought to himself: “I’ve achieved career success in life, but I haven’t achieved that. What they have is that inner light that I do not have.”

[Read More]


We Can All Be Teachers - Sunday, May 31, 2015

When asked who has made a real difference in our lives, we often think of a teacher. No matter how many years pass, we never forget the person who first opened our eyes to the wonders of science, art, or good books. In fact, we learn very few—if any—of life’s valuable lessons on our own. We all need caring, experienced mentors to guide us through our learning experiences.

[Read More]


Remembering - Sunday, May 24, 2015

A family with teenage children has a cherished tradition that has served them for generations. Each time one of the children leaves home for a date or an activity with friends, the father always says, “Remember who you are and what you represent.” The teenagers have grown to expect this gentle reminder. It’s the same reminder their father heard his parents say to him a generation earlier.

[Read More]


Learning Resilience - Sunday, May 17, 2015

Nobody seeks out suffering. And yet it is one of life’s great ironies that the moments that make us feel weakest often reveal our hidden strengths. We don’t really know what we can endure until we are forced to endure it. Yale University professor Steven Southwick believes that “most of us are a lot more resilient than we think.”1 He compares us to a green tree branch—it may not seem as strong as a more mature, rigid limb. But in a strong wind it’s the green branch that survives, bending but never breaking.

[Read More]


A Mother's Love - Sunday, May 10, 2015

The year was 1918, the close of World War I. An American Red Cross nurse wrote a letter to the mother of a soldier who had died shortly after the armistice was signed. He had made it through the terrors of war without injury and then, sadly, succumbed in the hospital to pneumonia. Wanting the mother to have more than a brief message from the military about her son’s death, the nurse wrote of what she called the “little things that mean so much to a mother far away from her boy.”

[Read More]


When Anger Mounts - Sunday, May 3, 2015

If there is one common thread that runs through most of the world’s problems, it’s anger. Violence, abuse, and hatred all grow when fueled by anger’s empty fumes. We’ve all seen how anger damages relationships and destroys love and trust. What’s more, medical researchers have recently found that anger can lead to sleeping problems, excess eating, and long-term heart damage.1 No, nothing good comes from anger.

[Read More]


Tidying Up - Sunday, April 26, 2015

Even though most of us realize that true happiness does not come from the things we accumulate, for some reason we still end up accumulating a lot of things. Sometimes our homes and closets and lives are filled with so much clutter, so much stuff, that we feel overwhelmed, even burdened by it all. There’s so much to take care of, to worry about, to dust and clean, that the clutter seems to smother the joy out of life.

[Read More]


Patience - Sunday, April 19, 2015

Pottery is among mankind’s oldest and most enduring crafts. The process itself feels like a work of art, as the expert potter carefully, patiently shapes a lump of clay into a beautiful, useful vessel. While finishing the work takes time and patient effort, the result is clearly worth it. It’s no wonder that pottery making is often used as a metaphor for how our lives are gently molded by the patient hand of God.

[Read More]


Awe- Sunday, April 12, 2015

At the end of a long day of school and work, a busy college student was asked about his exhausting day. Instead of mentioning his difficult chemistry class or his burdensome homework assignment, he talked about the beautiful sunset he saw on his way home. The highlight of his day was a moment of awe.

[Read More]


The Hope of This Season - Sunday, April 5, 2015

It’s been said that God rewrites the book of Genesis every spring.1 “In the beginning” takes on special meaning each year as we witness the renewed life, the rebirth, and the new beginnings that seem to be built in to earth’s cycle of seasons. It’s as if nature itself is trying to tell us that whatever we are going through, things can change—things can get better.

[Read More]


Try Something New - Sunday, March 29, 2015

A woman who loved soufflé decided to make some for her family for a special occasion. But she became nervous when she read the recipe for the light, fluffy cake. Soufflé is not easy to make, and it has to be served quickly to keep it from falling. So as the years, holidays, and birthdays went by, she continued to save the recipe, not quite ready to attempt it.

[Read More]


To Love - Sunday, March 22, 2015

Only those who are willing to risk heartbreak and disappointment will ever know what it means to truly love.

As C. S. Lewis put it: “To love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything, and your heart will certainly be wrung and possibly broken. If you want to make sure of keeping [your heart] intact, you must give [it] to no one, not even to an animal.

[Read More]


A Story to Tell - Sunday, March 15, 2015

One of Mark Twain’s stories tells of an artist, George Sterling, who finds most of humanity—other than himself—rather uninteresting. Self-absorbed in his own career and interests, he takes little notice of the people around him.

[Read More]


Fail Forward - Sunday, March 8, 2015

At the start of a new semester, the president of a large university advised his students: “We will all fail. More than once. Every day.” Not exactly the inspiring pep talk they may have expected. But then he added: “My plea for you today is to learn how to fail successfully.”1

[Read More]


A Song of the Heart - Sunday, March 1, 2015

Few things release the feelings of the heart like singing does. It brings deep emotions to the surface that we might otherwise struggle to express. When we sing, we reveal what’s in our soul, and this honesty of heart connects us with others despite barriers of time, place, and culture.

[Read More]


Milestones on the Road of Life - Sunday, February 22, 2015

In 1753 the British government, with its heavy hand on the American colonies, put Benjamin Franklin in charge of the colonial postal system north of Maryland. Postage prices were assessed by the mile in those days, and Franklin’s fellow colonists were suspicious that the British were overcharging.



[Read More]


Breaking Bread - Sunday. February 21, 2016

We live in a time of great division. Advances in technology have, in many ways, made our world smaller, but instead of coming together, we seem at times to be growing farther apart. Many of us wish for a way to bridge the cultural divides around us. We see people of other faiths or other nationalities, and we wonder how we might befriend those who seem so different from us.

[Read More]


Those Three Words - Sunday, February 15, 2015

If you knew that this was your last day on earth—that tomorrow your life would end—what would you do today? Most people would probably not try to squeeze in one more day at the office or one last television program. More than likely, you would spend most of the day trying to reach the people who are dear to you, simply to say, one last time, “I love you.”

[Read More]


Try Your Best - Sunday, February 8, 2015

No one ever does everything perfectly right all the time. Each of us makes mistakes and falls short of perfection. That’s life, and that’s OK.

Broadway musical star Idina Menzel shared how she came to this realization. Recently, she wrote: “There are about 3 million notes in a two-and-a-half-hour musical; being a perfectionist, it took me a long time to realize that if I’m hitting 75 percent of them, I’m succeeding. . . . I am more than the notes I hit, and that’s how I try to approach my life. You can’t get it all right all the time, but you can try your best. If you’ve done that, all that’s left is to accept your shortcomings and have the courage to try to overcome them.”1

[Read More]


Rejoice with Those Who Rejoice - Sunday, February 1, 2015

Feeling genuinely happy for another person’s good fortune may be one of the truest marks of authentic goodness and real friendship. Surprisingly, it sometimes seems easier to find someone who will weep with us during our hard times than to find someone who will rejoice with us in our successes. Most people are compassionate and caring toward those who suffer, but a special quality manifests itself in those who are genuinely happy for the good fortune of others

[Read More]


As We Age - Sunday, January 25, 2015

In many ways, life gets better with age—sometimes surprisingly so. The common belief is that a person’s overall sense of well-being goes downhill as he or she gets older, but researchers are finding—and many older people themselves are discovering—that this is not necessarily the case.

[Read More]


The Right Man for the Time - Sunday, January 18, 2015

Always there have been struggles—for individuals and for groups. But for each struggle, there are always men and women who rise above the ugly and the combative and make the world a better place—people whose greatness seems a perfect match for the challenge of the day.

[Read More]


Don’t Be Tricked - Sunday, January 11, 2015

Every magician knows that the secret to any magic trick—from pulling a rabbit out of a hat to making a coin disappear—is really quite simple: distraction. All the magician has to do is focus our attention on something that seems important but is really unrelated—the waving of a wand or a flurry of fingers. Meanwhile, the trick is taking place on the side, and we don’t even notice it.

[Read More]


A More Purposeful Life - Sunday, January 4, 2015

As another new year rolled around, a middle-aged man sat quietly in his favorite chair. His wife noticed him staring ahead with a thoughtful look on his face and said, “Jim, you look troubled. Is there something on your mind?”
“Yes,” he replied. “Here we are at the beginning of another year, and it doesn’t look like it will be any different from the last one—or the one before that. It makes me wonder how much meaning my life really has. I feel like I work hard every day, but what’s the real purpose of it all?”

[Read More]


The Morning and Evening Questions - Sunday, December 28, 2014

Benjamin Franklin is known for many things; he was a founding father, statesman, scientist, philosopher, author, entrepreneur, inventor, and businessman. But as great as his achievements are, he was aware of his own failings and tirelessly sought to improve them. He wrote, “I was surpris’d to find myself so much fuller of faults than I had imagined; but I had the satisfaction of seeing them diminish.”1

[Read More]


Fear Not - Sunday, December 21, 2014

During this joyful season, we reflect upon the greatest story ever told. It is not a long story, comprising only a chapter or two of scriptures, but it is so rich with meaning that with each reading we can find a new pearl of truth, a new insight that endears the story to us even more.

[Read More]


Luke 2 - Sunday, December 14, 2014

And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus, that all the world should be taxed.

And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city.

And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judea, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem…

[Read More]


Childlike Wonder - Sunday, December 7, 2014

What is it that makes this such a magical time of year? Undoubtedly, part of the reason is the eager smiles and happy anticipation of the children around us. The air seems to tingle with their joy and excitement. Yet, as we age, we sometimes lose that innocent, joyous outlook.

[Read More]


You Can't Buy Christmas - Sunday, November 30, 2014

Love, family, and faith make Christmas meaningful. Store-bought stuff may fill stockings and surround trees, but it doesn’t fill our hearts with joy and contentment for long. During the holiday season, the more we chase after merchandise, the further we get from the true spirit of the holiday.

[Read More]


A Time to Give Thanks - Sunday, November 23, 2014

A time to give thanks for life’s bounties and blessings deserves a place on our calendars and in our hearts. Despite problems personal and global—or perhaps because of them—taking time to count our blessings is good for the soul.

[Read More]


We Need Everyone - Sunday, November 16, 2014

We live in a society that often seems to value outgoing, adventurous personalities over others. In a variety of ways, our culture suggests that we need to be bold to be successful, talkative to be happy, even loud to be worth hearing. This message is so pervasive that those who are more introspective, private, and quiet can begin to feel ashamed of their personality traits.

[Read More]


“From Little Things” - Sunday, November 9, 2014

(Lloyd) In 1948, three years after World War II, Stalin made a grab for all of Eastern Europe, leaving over two million people in West Berlin isolated and desperate for basic necessities. To help relieve their suffering, the Allies began airlifting supplies. One of the pilots, Gail Halvorsen, met some destitute but hopeful West Berlin children through a barbed wire fence near the runway.

[Read More]


Love Never Counts - Sunday. November 2, 2014

Love has no end and no limits. It remains when all else fails; it grows as hearts are knit together in the bonds of kindness, selflessness, and compassion; it simply endures. And just as true love never quits, it also never counts or itemizes—it flows freely from an abundant heart

[Read More]


Behind the Scenes - Sunday, October 26, 2014

Our lives are enriched—usually without our knowing—by countless people we’ll never meet. They are the people working behind the scenes, and a football game, a Broadway musical, even a cup of yogurt on a market shelf—to cite just a few examples—could not happen without them. In fact, this broadcast would not be possible each week without a host of dedicated people whom you don’t see.

[Read More]


“The First Girl Scout” - Sunday, October 19, 2014

Stories of admirable people often reveal that great achievements grow not from a life of ease and comfort but from the fertile seedbed of heartache and difficulty. The life of Juliette Gordon Low is one of those stories.

[Read More]


This Is Our Time - Sunday, October 12, 2014

Have you ever wanted to trade places with someone? Maybe you know someone whose life appears to be so happy, so free from heartache, pain, and difficulty—especially when compared to yours. Perhaps he or she has better health, a more exciting job, or more possessions or prestige. Or maybe you’ve wished you could live in a different age of history, when times seemed simpler and stresses seemed more manageable.

[Read More]


Time Well Spent - Sunday, October 5, 2014

In Proverbs we read the admonition “Ponder the path of thy feet” (Proverbs 4:26). Often our feet move so quickly from one important task to another that thoughtfully pondering our path can seem unrealistic—or even a waste of time.

[Read More]


Feed the Good Wolf - Sunday, September 28, 2014

An old legend tells of a wise grandfather teaching his grandson about the importance of making good choices. “A fight is going on inside me,” he explained to the boy. “It’s a terrible fight between two wolves. One is evil: he is anger, greed, selfishness, resentment, lies, and pride.”

[Read More]


“The Heroes We Remember” - Sunday, September 21, 2014

Every veteran has a story. Some spent their military service in the line of fire; others gave their service behind the scenes. Some carried weapons; some carried a medical bag. Whether on the ground, in the air, or on the water, all who willingly respond to the call to serve their country see it as a high and holy calling to protect, safeguard, and strengthen the land they love.

[Read More]


The Unfolding of Human Lives - Sunday, September 14, 2014

On New Year’s Day 1892, a ship of immigrants docked at Ellis Island in New York harbor. Annie Moore, a teenager from County Cork, Ireland, was the first immigrant registered at America’s new reception station. She and her two younger brothers, Anthony and Phillip, had sailed in steerage class for 12 days on the steamship Nevada to join their parents, who had arrived in the United States previously

[Read More]


Putting People before Opinions - Sunday, September 7, 2014

This will always be a world of differing opinions. Like a brook that bubbles over rocks and obstructions, we frequently bump up against those who disagree with us. Learning how to deal with such obstacles is essential to happy living. Sometimes we navigate around them, proceeding on our way. Other times we find ourselves swirling in an eddy, unable to go forward—or worse, immobile and stagnant.

[Read More]


“Work Worth Doing” - Sunday, August 31, 2014

Work is what people do—and not just when they are grown. Toddlers have their work too: learning to walk and speak and use a spoon. Teenagers work at learning responsibility and at discovering and developing their talents. Adults work at applying those talents to make a difference in their families and the community. The true reward for work is not a paycheck—it is life!

[Read More]


Welcome-Homes - Sunday, August 24, 2014

If it’s true, as Shakespeare wrote, that “parting is such sweet sorrow,”1 then perhaps we could say that reuniting is the sweetest joy. While saying goodbye can be heart-wrenching at times, reconnecting with loved ones we haven’t seen in a while can be among life’s greatest moments.

[Read More]


Keeping Relationships Afloat - Sunday, August 17, 2014

A wise ship captain keeps his vessel in constant repair. He knows that a small leak today can grow into a sizeable hole tomorrow and sink the boat.

[Read More]


A Little More Kind - Sunday, August 10, 2014

One thing this world needs more of is kindness. Our daily interactions provide limitless opportunities for more patience, thoughtfulness, forgiveness, and compassion: in other words, more kindness

[Read More]


The Process of Life - Sunday, August 3, 2014

When a young family moved into their first home, they decided to build a playhouse for the kids in the backyard. The parents and children threw their hearts into the project, carefully selecting the wood, the shingles, and all the supplies.

[Read More]


We All Need Love - July 27, 2014

We all know that food, water, and shelter are essential to sustain life. But there’s another basic need that is too often overlooked—the need to love and be loved. Gentle touches, soft words, sweet smiles, and adoring looks nurture our soul in a way that nothing else can. No matter how old or young, we all need love.

[Read More]


Walk On – Sunday, July 20, 2014

The sometimes tragic experiences of the early American pioneers are more than just interesting history lessons. Though they took place over a century and a half ago, they can serve as an inspiration to us today. Such is the case with the story of James and Sarah Ferguson McDonald.

[Read More]


What They May Become - July 13, 2014

John Trebonius was a humble schoolteacher in Germany many years ago. He was known for the unusually respectful attitude he showed toward the young people in his classroom. Even when they seemed a little unruly, he would treat them well. “Who knows?” he would say. “There may be among my pupils a great poet, a great preacher, a great philosopher!”1 Although it was the Germanic custom of the day for professors to keep their hats on when entering the schoolroom, John Trebonius always removed his, explaining, “I do not know but that there sits among [these students] one who will change the destiny of mankind. I take off my hat in deference to what they may become.”2

[Read More]


"A Feeling That Nurtures the Soul" – Sunday, July 6, 2014

Happiness and gratitude are linked together inseparably. Those who are grateful tend to be happier, and those who are happy tend to be more grateful. Happiness and gratitude simply go together. Scholars and scientists, poets and philosophers have connected them for generations.

[Read More]


What Can You Do? – Sunday, June 29, 2014

In an elementary school classroom filled with energetic children, the teacher asks the students to respond to two questions. The first question is “What do you like most about living in America?” The answers come quickly: the beautiful land and scenery, the lakes and mountains, the many things to do and see, the freedom, the people, and on and on. After the children finish their responses, the teacher asks a second and more important question: “So what can you do to make America better?”

[Read More]


“For When I Am Weak, Then Am I Strong”

The Bible records that the Apostle Paul had what he called “a thorn in the flesh”—a trial or difficulty that helped to keep him humble and steadfast. He asked the Lord three times to take it from him, but it remained. Yet Paul came to see divine purpose in his infirmities and hardships, declaring with great wisdom, “For when I am weak, then am I strong.”

[Read More]